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Ucas Personal Statement Examples Geography Of Greece

The personal statement is a crucial part of university applications in the UK. It’s your chance to show what makes you unique, besides your birth name and UCAS ID. In just 4,000 characters you have to convince your chosen university that you are the best applicant, and that they should make you an offer immediately. These 4,000 characters are your only chance, so your personal statement needs to be good. Really good. Here are some tips on how to write a truly outstanding piece.

1. Make a draft without a character counter.

When I started writing, I thought it would be a good idea to start with the character counter turned on, so I wouldn’t go over the 4,000 limit. First mistake… After 3,500 characters I started panicking because I was only halfway through my story. So I turned off the character counter and continued writing. At the end I had 7,000 characters instead of 4,000, but I had written down everything I wanted to say, and I only had to delete some words and compress it. That’s far easier than inserting more ideas while keeping it under 4,000 characters at the same time. By the way, the final version was 3,999 characters!

2. Take your time.

Do not rush it. A superb personal statement will not be ready in a couple of hours. Or even a couple of days. It took me more than a month to complete the version I finally sent in. Sometimes it’s worth taking a break for a few days, then coming back to it afresh.

3. Find the perfect words and expressions.

It sounds more professional and elegant if you use ‘accomplish’ rather than ‘do’, or ‘presume’ rather than ‘think’. As an international applicant, it was even more difficult since English is not my native language, but there are some useful translation and synonym programs on the internet to help with this. I used Google Translate primarily, which includes a great deal of synonyms if you translate words from English to another language. But this synonym thing should be carefully performed, as using too many fancy words could make your statement sound overdone and difficult to read.

4. Concentrate on your strengths.

In these 4,000 characters you are trying to sell yourself to the university. A perfect product proposer is all about how great that thing is, and it’s the same with your personal statement. You should write about your experiences, your knowledge and your future plans. You should NOT write, “I wanted to learn Spanish but I gave it up after a week” or “I am not very good at maths, but I think this is understandable since I hate it so much.”

5. Find the perfect opening sentence.

Starting with something funny, interesting, unusual or surprising will give a good first impression. But do not try to squeeze something funny out of your brain; that is useless. The perfect opening sentence will just hit you in a random moment, when you have already worked hours and hours on your personal statement. So, just wait and do not overthink it.

6. Make it your own work, voice and ideas.

I suggest that you should not read any other personal statements before writing the first few drafts of yours. It will simply give you a false idea. You are most definitely unique, and it is worthless to follow some set rules or patterns, or someone else’s ideas. After all, this is about you, not somebody else.

7. Be honest.

Do not write that you are fluent in Spanish if you can only say “I love you” in Spanish. Do not write that you are good at problem-solving if your sole example is a trick of carrying five bottles in one hand. If you are good, you are good the way you are. There is no need to create a false image, and indeed the truth will always come out sooner or later.

8. Get someone to proofread your statement.

Your parents, your teachers, your friends, your enemies… The more people you show it to, the more feedback you will get, and the better the final version will be. Of course, some advice will be better and some less so, but it is easier to ask many people first, and differentiate later.

9. Read it out loud many times.

It helped me a lot when I read my personal statement out to my family and friends. When you are writing it sentence by sentence, you might not realize that there is no cohesion between your paragraphs. But when you read it out, all the vague parts will magically appear, so you can correct them.

10. Once you submit your university application, stop reading it!

I’d recommend not reading it for a few months once you’ve sent it in. You might feel it’s not as good as you thought previously, but this is normal. Waiting to hear from universities is the worst part of the whole process (even worse than completing the application form…). After you get the offer you wanted (which you will surely get, I know!), you will know that your application was just perfect the way you sent it.

To sum up, be yourself and write honestly about your experiences. Use your own voice, because that is who you are, and the universities are interested in you, not an ideal text based on a “how to write a personal statement” article…

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We hope our collection of UCAS Archaeology personal statements provides inspiration for writing your own. Please do not plagiarise them in any way, or UCAS will penalise your application. Our Personal Statement Editing & Review Services are available if you feel you need a little extra help.

If you are applying to university in the USA, please visit Studential.com/us.

I have a strong interest in history and the past, which began in early childhood. More particularly, my earliest interests were in mediaeval English history. My enjoyment of archaeology began with programmes such as Time Team, and similar documentary series, which showed me how exciting the task of uncovering the past and its secrets could be...

Archaeology & Anthropology personal statement For as long as I can remember, I have been skilled and deeply interested in areas of both the sciences and humanities, particularly in human evolution, history and geography...

Anthropology and Archaeology Personal Statement

My interest in culture first started when I began to attend my local Hindu Temple with my friend in primary school. I was highly interested in how her surroundings differed from my own and enjoyed immersing myself in her way of life...

I have always had a fascination with the archaeological world. Archaeology provides me with the opportunity to question how my ancestors lived, worked, survived and created what is now the world today...

What excites me about archaeology is the excitement and anticipation from finding those missing pieces of the jigsaw that make up our past. My earliest recollection of archaeology was from 10 years ago when my parents took me on holiday to the Greek island of Kos and whilst there, we visited the Asklepion ruins, and I was amazed by what had remained from Greek times...

My attraction to Archaeology and Ancient History has been shaped by my understanding that the past is incredibly important in our modern lifestyles; two years ago when I visited Rome for the first time I truly appreciated what this meant...

When I was two years old my family relocated from the New World, Canada, to the Old, and since then I have journeyed to places as far off as Rome, Egypt, and Thailand, among many others. Everywhere I travelled brought upon me a new wave of fresh fascination; not only in the cultural differences I noticed, but in the circumstances, traditions, and history that shaped them...

I was nine years old, and we live in Chicago, Illinois. That year my family had a membership to the Field Museum of Natural History, and every Saturday would find us on the train to the Field. Our first stop was always the pyramid...

Archaeology and History Personal Statement

When I was younger, I had always wished to travel to the United Kingdom. I loved everything about it: the history, the architecture, the food, the people, the music, and so much more. Living in a rural part of the United States, it was rich in a culture completely opposite to my own...

Archaeology and Anthropology Personal Statement

As an immigrant living in Spain, I am constantly reminded of the importance social and cultural factors have on my daily life, the language I speak, and the difference between the relationships I maintain with people from my own country and those I encounter here on a daily basis...

Ancient History & Egyptology Personal Statement

For me, History has always been a forerunner when it comes to choosing a degree at university. From an early age I have always enjoyed learning about the past and how some key events like the Battle of Britain and 9/11, have shaped our future...

Archaeology and Museum Studies Personal Statement

What fascinates me the most about archaeology is how easily it nowadays allows us to find out more about the past. Just the fact that carbon dating technology can tell us almost the exact age of an object is amazing...

Archaeology Personal Statement

I have always enjoyed learning about different cultures and civilisations, reflected in my enduring love of history, and more recently, archaeology. Compared to modern history, archaeology carries a sense of enigma which makes it much more stimulating for an imaginative and inquisitive mind...

Archaeology Personal Statement

Finding a Denarius of Domitian was one of the highlights of the “Discovering Dorchester” archaeological dig this summer with Oxford Archaeology & Oxford University. I put into practice some of my first year A level Archaeology course and confirmed my fascination with civilisations of the past...

Classical Archaeology Master's Personal Statement

Archaeology is the material connection between our history and the contemporary present. Analysis of each artifact, site, or feature brings us closer to understanding where we came from, and pushes us towards discovering where we are going...

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