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Water Names By Lan Samantha Chang Essay

Carter, Emily. “Chang Debuts with Uneven Stories.” Minneapolis Star Tribune, November 22, 1998, p. 18F. In practically the only negative review of Hunger, Carter says that Chang’s writing is basic, writing-school fare and that her psychological insights are simple; argues that Chang stays close to the themes of assimilation and forgetfulness with which immigrant parents want to escape the past while the children want to understand it.

Chang, Lan Samantha. “Out of Parents’ Silence Comes a Daughter’s Tales.” Interview by Scott Martelle. Los Angeles Times, December 21, 1998, p. E3. In this interview/feature story, Chang talks about her parents’ reticence about the past and her creation of stories that allowed her to work through questions about them. Martelle discusses the universality of the stories, which Chang says are about things that happen over and over again. Chang discusses the conflict in her stories between children who wish to know their parents and parents who want to make new lives in America for their children.

Messud, Claire. “A Hole in Our House.” The New York Times, October 25, 1998, pp. 7, 24. In this review, Messud says that Chang offers no easy resolution for the immigrant experience; says her stories express internal struggles in a complex way; discusses several stories, praising...

Nominated for numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and PEN Center USA-West's annual literary award, this debut collection by a young Chinese-American writer has garnered stellar reviews and invited comparisons to Amy Tan and Maxine Hong Kingston. These stories reveal the lives of immigrant families haunted by lost loves: a ghost seduces a young girlNominated for numerous awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and PEN Center USA-West's annual literary award, this debut collection by a young Chinese-American writer has garnered stellar reviews and invited comparisons to Amy Tan and Maxine Hong Kingston. These stories reveal the lives of immigrant families haunted by lost loves: a ghost seduces a young girl into a flooded river; a mother commands a daughter to avenge her father's death; and a woman speaks from beyond the grave about her tragic marriage to a man whose own disappointments nearly destroy their two daughters. In luminous prose Lan Samantha Chang weaves the forces of war and magic, food and desire, ghosts and family, into haunting tales that signal the arrival of an exciting new writer and "a work of gorgeous, enduring prose" (The Washington Post)....more

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