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Pa Essay Example

To be a good sport and to help you get into PA school, I have decided to post my own personal statement. It is not my best work, but it served its purpose. I was invited to interview at five very competitive programs and was accepted to three (I turned down the other two interviews).

As an English major and former tutor, I feel I have a lot to offer on this subject.

For starters, read my post Writing the Personal Statement. My best advice is there.

And remember that personal statements are awkward. They are almost sure to inspire writers block.

Hey, I pulled countless all-nighters during college in the name of crafting the perfect essay. In the end I learned that no essay is ever perfect. In the words of my favorite author Margaret Atwood, “If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word.” So get writing and see what happens.

Finally, sometimes all you need to start is a good example. My essay is reproduced in its entirety below. Maybe it will inspire you and maybe not. When I wrote it, I had about a dozen books opened on my bed searching for my own inspiration.

Anyway, write on!

 

My Personal Statement

It is hard–perhaps impossible–to judge the significance of any moment. Every day we are confronted with opportunity, and no one can tell which experience will lead to a groundbreaking thought or a new career. What matters more? That today I resolved never to eat junk food again? Or that I went on a walk in my back yard and stepped on an ant hill? Was it a teacher who inspired me to become an English major in college? Or a bug on the windowsill in class that made me daydream about becoming a writer?

It was so muggy outside. My face and my armpits and my legs were sticky; every joint was red and throbbing. I could hear horns blaring in the distance and cheering. But the mile marker said that I still had three miles to go. How could that be? If I could hear them then I had to be close. Those last three miles were the most excruciating of my life. My legs growled with every step. I had to push my hands against my thighs to keep my torso upright. When the finish line came, I took off running. I don’t know where the energy came from: it had perhaps been saved just for that moment. I crossed the white canopy and the marked electronic ribbon on the ground, took a few steps towards a tree and collapsed. I had no idea then, but finishing my first marathon was the moment in my life that led me to become passionate about health. Ultimately, it sent me back to school on a path towards becoming a physician assistant.

It really is not so farfetched that an English major would choose a career in healthcare. People keep laughing at how I have “switched gears”, but I know that candidates with diverse backgrounds are valuable to the PA profession. Besides, I believe that my love for healthcare and my love for literature come from the same place. I am very compassionate and analytical. I love reading stories that challenge me to see the world anew, especially if those stories are shrouded in rich metaphors and philosophy. My favorite novels are so full of detail that they read like poetry. One surprising observation I made when I started working in the emergency department at St. Francis Hospital is that the tasks of an English major are essentially the same as those of a PA: to listen critically to a story, discover the right details, analyze, form conclusions supported by evidence, and communicate effectively. Furthermore, both English majors and PAs have to be astute judges of character.

No I did not immediately know that I wanted to become a PA after the marathon. Initially I thought about becoming a personal trainer or physical therapist, since I was interested in exercise. However, it didn’t take long for me to realize that my interests were broader than that. I was interested in the diagnostics and analytical aspects of medicine, so I knew that I did not want to become a nurse. Of course, I thought about medical school but found that the PA profession has many advantages that the physician profession does not. The most important being that PAs can work in several different disciplines in medicine or change specialties, whereas a doctor would have to do another residency. I know that I am interested in becoming a surgical PA. However, I love working in the ED and imagine that I might like to do both. I am also a lifetime-learner, and I prefer new challenges to old ones. I might change specialties just for the opportunity to grow and try something different.

I think that the role of a PA is also more fitting to my personality and skills. I enjoy working under another professional. In fact, I find that I do my best work when I am anticipating the needs of a team leader and working steps ahead of them to improve quality and efficiency. This is one reason why I think I will enjoy being first assistant in surgery. Of course, I understand that PAs often function autonomously, consulting the doctor only as needed. In my job at the St. Francis ED, I often work side-by-side with the PAs in our Care Express, a hallway of five rooms where we treat non-urgent patients. I enjoy working there because I get to assist the PAs in all of their procedural work, from casting to sutures. Working this intimately with our PAs, I have gained a comprehensive understanding of the profession and the curriculum. One of our part-time PAs actually works weekdays in the operating room. I have spoken to her in detail about her experiences and day-to-day as a surgical PA.

I have worked at St. Francis now for over a year. In addition, I spent almost a year volunteering at the medical university in Charleston. What I have learned is that I love patient care as well as the culture and environment of the hospital. No I am not one of those candidates who grew up knowing that they wanted to do healthcare. Whether it was a marathon or a bug on a windowsill that inspired me to choose this path, I am forever grateful. I know that moments in my life–big and small–have led me to this profession for a reason, and I am eager to begin.

 

My Highlighter List (read the blog post entitled Writing the Personal Statement for explanation)

1) My love for healthcare and literature both come from the fact that I am compassionate and analytical in nature (from Paragraph 3)

2) The tasks of an English major and those of a PA are similar, and I enjoy those tasks (Paragraph 3)

3) I am interested in the diagnostics and analytical aspects of medicine, and my background as an English major has made me proficient at analysis (Paragraph 4)

4) I like that PAs can work in several disciplines and change specialties because I am a lifetime learner and have broad interests (Paragraph 4)

5) I enjoy working under another professional, as evidenced by previous experiences (Paragraph 5)

6) I enjoy doing the procedural, day-to-day work that PAs do, and I know this because I work right beside them at my job (Paragraph 5)

7) I have learned as a tech that I love patient care as well as the culture and the environment of the hospital (Paragraph 6)

(notice that I provide evidence or logic to justify every statement on my list)

John DeLucas

Originally an English major at Furman University, John DeLucas found his passion for medicine while working as a tech at an emergency department in Charleston, SC. After taking a number of prerequisite classes, John proudly accepted a seat in the physician assistant program at Penn State College of Medicine.

Author archive

Over at Inside PA Training Paul wrote a wonderful blog post about the common pitfalls that many PA school applicants fall victim to while preparing their PA school essay.

Common Physician Assistant Essay Pitfalls

  1. Clichés
  2. Lack of Specificity
  3. Weak Conclusion
  4. No Theme
  5. Boring Introduction

This is an excellent list because eight years ago while I was applying to PA school I proved how adhering to each one of these elements was a guaranteed formula for failure.

I wrote a blog post a while back about how to get into the PA school of your choice. Part of my recommendation was to throw caution to the wind and apply with your heart and not your mind. This as you know, is easier said than done.

Every one of the above pitfalls is what happens when you think too much.

The Six Hundred Words (or Less) that Changed my Life

I applied to five PA schools in 2001 (prior to The Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA).

First, I used an essay that I thought gave the review committee everything they would need to see that I was a stellar applicant. It showed my strengths, brown nosed a bit, and proved that I had the pedigree to be a wonderful healthcare provider.

But, as you will see, it lacked heart, honesty, passion and most of all . . .  grit.

I received my fourth rejection letter as I was completing my application for the University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ). I was demoralized.

That night I sat down at my computer and composed what would become the 600 words that changed my life forever. I had not read them for over 11 years until this morning.

I had never taken the time to go back and see what made the difference. What had made the essay I sent to UMDNJ different from the previous four flops? I was thinking about this list of essay pitfalls this morning and decided to go back and see if I could find my original essays. I was delighted to find all of them, they brought back strong feelings and wonderful memories.

I am going to share with you both essays. The one that worked, the one that didn't, and I want you to guess the winner. Avoid the urge to reveal the answer, reading through both essays will help you as you sit down to write your personal statement.

When I applied to UMDNJ (Rutgers) I was 0.1 points below the minimum GPA requirement to even consider sending an application. The fact that they opened my application, and offered me an interview was a miracle. Yet, I was admitted just a week after my trip to New Jersey.

Where were those other 4.0 Ivy leaguers I met during my interview? They were placed on the waiting list.

I am not trying to gloat, but I want to point out that the essay may be the single most important thing you do. I believe it is the reason I was accepted to PA school.

Two PA School Applications Essays: Why Do You Want To Be a PA-C?

PA School Essay # 1

PA School Essay #2

Which essay is the one that got me an acceptance letter?

The difference: One is written from the heart, the other is full of clichés, lacks specificity, has no theme, has a boring introduction and a weak conclusion!

Final Thoughts

As you sit down to write your PA school application essay remember this example.

In life, almost nothing ever goes to those who try to blend into the crowd. Your PA School application essay should be different, reflect who you really are and not pander to what you think other people want to hear. This is a rule of thumb not just for your essay and for applying to PA school but for life in general.

As you write dig deep, don't hold back, believe in your words. Set your mind aside and try to find that place inside your head where your heart resides. This is where you will separate yourself from the crowd, this is where your journey to PA both begins and ends!

Are you struggling to write your physician assistant personal statement? Are you dreading a second, third or fourth application cycle?
If so, we are here to help! Save time, money and frustration.  Write an essay that gets you an interview on the first try.  Sign up for the Physician Assistant Essay Collaborative
View all posts in this series
  • How to Write the Perfect Physician Assistant School Application Essay
  • The Physician Assistant Essay and Personal Statement Collaborative
  • Do You Recognize These 7 Common Mistakes in Your Personal Statement?
  • Prerequisite Coursework: How to Design the Perfect Pre-PA School Curriculum
  • Healthcare Experience Required for PA School: The Ultimate Guide
  • 7 Essays in 7 Days: PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 1, “A PA Changed My Life”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 2, “I Want to Move Towards the Forefront of Patient Care”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 3, “She Smiled, Said “Gracias!” and Gave me a Big Hug”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 4, “I Have Gained so Much Experience by Working With Patients”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 5, “Then Reach, my Son, and Lift Your People up With You”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 6, “That First Day in Surgery was the First Day of the Rest of my Life”
  • PA Personal Statement Workshop: Essay 7, “I Want to Take People From Dying to Living, I Want to Get Them Down From the Cliff.”
  • Physician Assistant Personal Statement Workshop: “To say I was an accident-prone child is an understatement”
  • 9 Simple Steps to Avoid Silly Spelling and Grammar Goofs in Your PA School Personel Statement
  • 5 Tips to Get you Started on Your Personal Essay (and why you should do it now)
  • How to Write Your Physician Assistant Personal Statement The Book!
  • How to Write “Physician Assistant” The PA Grammar Guide
  • Secrets of Successful PA School Letters of Recommendation
  • 101 PA School Admissions Essays: The Book!
  • 5 Things I’ve Learned Going Into My Fourth Physician Assistant Application Cycle
  • 7 Tips for Addressing Shortcomings in Your PA School Personal Statement

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Why Do You Want To Be a Physician Assistant?

Every day is a gift to be embraced wholeheartedly.  It is our job to fill that day with a hopeful and meaningful purpose.  It has been said that “the most important thing in life is to live your life for something more important than your life” William James.  It is deeply rooted in this philosophy that I desire to become a physician assistant (PA).  I hope to provide quality healthcare to the underprivileged, an area of medicine, which I have noted to be dramatically underserved.

I became involved in health care four years ago to help finance my college education. I worked as a medical record's clerk in the University of Washington health clinic.  In addition to delivering medical records, I assisted the hospital staff in a variety of activities.  I loved working with the staff and admired how well they operated as a team.  I desired more direct patient care and in January 1998, when a student position opened in the lab, I jumped at the opportunity.  In a few weeks, I was drawing blood, interacting with patients, and helping with a variety of technical procedures.  I loved what I was doing. The patients were often uneasy when facing a needle for the first time.  I was able to comfort them, help them to smile, and ease their nervous tensions.  My job required that I work throughout the various University hospitals.  This provided an opportunity to work within a variety of settings, and with people of all ages.  Whether it was doing morning rounds in labor and delivery or working in the campus health clinic, one thing always remained the same; I found great satisfaction in caring for patients and learning of their needs.  I felt a career in medicine was truly for me.

While working at the clinic I discovered the PA profession.  I have always enjoyed the complexities of science and have been fascinated by a career in medicine.  In pursuit of this goal, I decided to speak with one of the resident doctors in the clinic. She introduced me to the role of Physician Assistant.  After that, I immersed myself in research.  I was surprised to learn that many people with whom I worked were Physician Assistants.   I met with hospital staff, nurse practitioners, Physician Assistants, and physical therapists.  I regularly visited the PA at the clinic and admired his significant level of patient interaction and his ability to work both autonomously and alongside other physicians and nurses.  I admired the PA program's flexibility and versatility, which would allow a change of specialties if I desired.  I began to focus my attention on becoming a PA.  Being an independent thinker, as well as a people oriented individual; I feel that I am well suited, not just for a career in the medical field, but for a lifetime career as a Physician Assistant.

Why Do You Want To Be a Physician Assistant?

As a child, every day, I would swing on the swing set in the backyard of my house. I would sit there for hours, without a care in the world simply singing songs and swinging back and forth. On that swing, I felt untouchable. Like a bird in flight, my only cares were that of the sky and the beauty of each adjoining minute. In the swings gentle motion I was overcome with a sense of peace.

We wake one day and find that the swing no longer exists.  Our backyard has been rebuilt and the ground, which had once supported our youth, has been transcended.   We search again for the swing, longing to find a resemblance of that peace.  We hope to find it each day, as the product of our life and of our career.

A woman smiled at me one day, her name was Margaret.   The wrinkles on her face told a story and in her hands there played a motion picture.  She sat crouched in a wheelchair; I sat on a stool beside her.  I had been working as a phlebotomist in the University Clinic for two years.  I was a friend of Margaret’s because every Wednesday at six she would arrive at the clinic for her routine blood work.  Everybody liked Margaret; she used to tell us stories of her childhood and her husband who had given his life to the war.  She had grown especially fond of me because “I had freckles like her grandson.”  She used to come alone, but had grown weaker; this was the first time her daughter had accompanied her. Her daughter looked tired and spoke softly, “The best vein is in her hand” she explained, “it doesn’t hurt her there.”  I gently placed my hand on hers, and it was cold.  She looked to me and through the cold touch of her hand poured the warmth of her heart.   “It’s about time for dinner don’t you think mom”, said her daughter.  The clock rang six and I agreed.  “The medicines have been making her sick; she sometimes has troubles keeping her food down.” I looked closely at her face; it was thin and drooped to her chest. I realized that Margaret was unable to speak.   “Margaret, can you make a fist for me?”  “Just like last time.”  She clenched tightly. I withdrew the needle and collected a small sample of blood. She raised her head and with her frail hand, gently placed it on mine. I looked again to her eyes while placing a bandage on her hand.  It was warm now.  “Time for dinner mom”, replied her daughter. I smiled and waved goodbye “Margaret I will see you again next week.”  She raised her head and smiled. Without a word, she made perfect sense.  I never saw Margaret again.

In the memory of Margaret and every patient who has individually touched my every day, I have regained a piece of the backyard swing that I loved so much as a child. I have been directly involved in health care for four years. Every day has brought great joy.  To be a part of a person’s day is a wonderful blessing. Certainly, there are many pleasures in life.  But, for me, none is greater than that which we find in the healing touch of another. As the eternal motion of the swing, it is in this that I find great peace.

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