• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Ulrich Trautwein Homework Online

Doing homework is associated with change in students’ personality

Students who invest more effort in their homework show changes in conscientiousness, University of Tübingen researchers find

Homework may have a positive influence on students’ conscientiousness. As results of a study conducted by University of Tübingen researchers suggest, students who do more homework than their peers show positive changes in conscientiousness. Thus, schools may be doing more than contributing to students’ learning, but they may also be effecting changes of their students’ personality. The study results were published in the Journal of Research in Personality.

Previous research finds that homework effort is consistently related to student achievement. Also, conscientiousness appears to be the most important personality trait for predicting homework effort. With this connection in mind, proponents of homework have argued that the effort which students invest in their homework may have positive effects on students by influencing their conscientiousness. In their study, the Tübingen scientists investigated whether this claim holds true.

They analyzed data from a longitudinal study with 2,760 students from two different school tracks in the German states of Baden-Württemberg and Saxony. Students were initially assessed right after their transition from primary to secondary school in Grade 5. For the next three years, students were assessed annually between six and eight weeks after the start of each school year. They answered questions such as how many of their last 10 homework assignments in mathematics and German they did as well as possible. Also, they were asked how conscientious they thought they were including whether they would describe themselves as tidy or rather as messy and negligent. In addition to students’ self-reports, parents were asked to assess their children’s conscientiousness as well.

Results show that those students who invested a lot of effort in their homework between Grades 5 and 8 also profited in terms of their conscientiousness. Previous research has shown that conscientiousness tends to undergo a temporary dip in late childhood and early adolescence. As the results found by the Tübingen scientists suggest, doing your homework thoroughly and meticulously appeared to counterbalance this dip. Indeed, researchers found a substantial decrease in conscientiousness for students who reported that they had not made an effort with their homework. Those results were also backed by parents, whose reports matched those of their children.

“Our results show that homework is not only relevant for school performance, but also for personality development – provided that students put a lot of effort into their assignments,” says Richard Göllner, first author of the study. “The question whether doing your homework can also influence the development of conscientiousness has been mostly neglected in previous discussions of the role of homework,” criticizes Ulrich Trautwein, director of the Hector Research Institute of Education Sci-ences and Psychology. “We need to define more precisely what expectations we have of the poten-tial of homework and how those expectations can be fulfilled.”

Original publication:

Göllner, R., Damian, R. I., Rose, N., Spengler, M., Trautwein, U., Nagengast, B., & Roberts, B. W. (2017). Is doing your homework associated with becoming more conscientious? Journal of Re-search in Personality, 71, 1-12. doi:10.1016/j.jrp.2017.08.007

Contact:

University of Tübingen
Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology
www.hib.uni-tuebingen.de

Dr. Richard Göllner
Tel. +49 7071 29-73913
richard.goellner[at]uni-tuebingen.de

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Trautwein
Tel. +49 7071 29-73931
ulrich.trautwein[at]uni-tuebingen.de

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Public Relations Department
Dr. Karl Guido Rijkhoek
Director
Antje Karbe
Press Officer
Phone +49 7071 29-76789
Fax +49 7071 29-5566
antje.karbe[at]uni-tuebingen.de
www.uni-tuebingen.de/aktuell

<- Back to: Pressemitteilungen


Ulrich Trautwein (born 31 May 1972) is a German psychologist and education researcher. He has been a Full Professor of Education Science at the University of Tübingen, Germany, since October 2008.[1] In addition, he has been director of LEAD Graduate School & Research Network at Tübingen University since 2012.[2] Since 2014, he has also headed the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology in Tübingen.[3]

Life[edit]

Trautwein grew up in Reutlingen in the state of Baden-Württemberg. After completing his high school education he studied Psychology at the University of Göttingen, Germany, and the University of California, Santa Cruz. After obtaining his diploma in Göttingen 1999, he worked until 2008 in various positions as a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin. In 2002 he completed his doctorate, 2005 his habilitation in Psychology at the Free University of Berlin. In 2007 he became a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. Shortly after being appointed an Honorary Professor at the Free University of Berlin in 2008, he joined the University of Tübingen as a Full Professor of Education Science. Trautwein is director of LEAD Graduate School & Research Network at Tübingen University, founded in 2012.[4] LEAD features a research and training program for doctoral students and postdocs on learning, education achievement, and life course development. The School hosts more than 130 researchers and is funded by the German Universities Excellence Initiative of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.[5] In 2014, Trautwein became the founding director of the Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology.[6] Since 2011 Trautwein has served as an expert advisor to the German federal government and the Kultusministerkonferenz in terms of education issues.[1]

Research[edit]

Trautwein has published a large number of articles on a number of topics, including the development of conscientiousness, expectancy-value beliefs, and academic effort, the effectiveness of homework assignments and completion, and the results of several randomized controlled field trials in school settings. According to an analysis published by Jones et al. (2010) in Contemporary Education Psychology, Trautwein was the third most productive researcher worldwide in the field of education psychology during 2003–2008.[7] In 2016, Greenbaum et al. named him among the most productive researchers in education psychology as number 4 worldwide.[8] Trautwein is principal investigator of two multicohort, longitudinal school achievement studies (TOSCA,[9] TRAIN[10]).

Awards[edit]

  • CORECHED Prize in Educational Research awarded by the Swiss Council for Educational Research, 2009[11]
  • Young Investigator Award: Section for Educational Psychology of the German Psychological Society, 2004
  • Otto Hahn Medal for outstanding PhD dissertation, Max Planck Society, 2003[1]

Publications[edit]

  • Bertram, C., Wagner, W., & Trautwein, U. (2017). Learning historical thinking with oral history interviews. A cluster randomized controlled intervention study of oral history interviews in history lessons. American Educational Research Journal, 54, 444–484. doi: 10.3102/0002831217694833[12]
  • Gaspard, H., Dicke, A.-L., Flunger, B., Brisson, B., Häfner, I., Nagengast, B., & Trautwein, U. (2015). Fostering adolescents’ value beliefs for mathematics with a relevance intervention in the classroom. Developmental Psychology, 51, 1226–1240. doi: 10.1037/dev0000028[13]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Nagy, N., Lenski, A., Niggli, A., & Schnyder, I. (2015). Using individual interest and conscientiousness to predict academic effort: additive, synergistic, or compensatory effects? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 109, 142–162. doi:10.1037/pspp0000034[14]
  • Chmielewski, A. K., Dumont, H., & Trautwein, U. (2013). Tracking effects depend on tracking type: An international comparison of mathematics self-concept. American Educational Research Journal, 50, 925–957. doi:10.3102/0002831213489843[15]
  • Trautwein, U., Marsh, H.W., Nagengast, B., Lüdtke, O., Nagy, G., & Jonkmann, K. (2012). Probing for the multiplicative term in modern expectancy-value theory: A latent interaction modeling study. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 763–777. doi:10.1037/a0027470[16]
  • Dettmers, S., Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Kunter, M., & Baumert, J. (2010). Homework works if homework quality is high: using multilevel modeling to predict the development of achievement in mathematics. Journal of Educational Psychology, 102, 467–482. doi:10.1037/a0018453[17]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., & Nagy, G. (2009). Within-school social comparison: How students’ perceived standing of their class predicts academic self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 853–866. doi:10.1037/a0016306[18]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Roberts, B. W., Schnyder, I., & Niggli, A. (2009). Different forces, same consequence: Conscientiousness and competence beliefs are independent predictors of academic effort and achievement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97, 1115–1128. doi:10.1037/a0017048[19]
  • Trautwein, U., Niggli, A., Schnyder, I., & Lüdtke, O. (2009). Between-teacher differences in homework assignments and the development of students’ homework effort, homework emotions, and achievement. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 176–189. doi:10.1037/0022–0663.101.1.176[20]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Köller, O., & Baumert, J. (2006). Self-esteem, academic self-concept, and achievement: How the learning environment moderates the dynamics of self-concept. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 334–349. doi:10.1037/0022–3514.90.2.334[21]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Marsh, H. W., Köller, O., & Baumert, J. (2006). Tracking, grading, and student motivation: Using group composition and status to predict self-concept and interest in ninth grade mathematics. Journal of Educational Psychology, 98, 788–806. doi:10.1037/0022–0663.98.4.788[22]
  • Trautwein, U., Lüdtke, O., Schnyder, I., & Niggli, A. (2006). Predicting homework effort: Support for a domain-specific, multilevel homework model. Journal of Educational Psychology, 98, 438–456. doi:10.1037/0022–0663.98.2.438[23]

External links[edit]

  • Webpage of Ulrich Trautwein[3]
  • Homepage of Hector Research Institute[24]
  • Homepage of LEAD Graduate School[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"Curriculum Vitae | Hector-Institut für Empirische Bildungsforschung |". Universität Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  2. ^"Boards and Bodies | LEAD Graduate School and Research Network |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  3. ^ ab"Prof. Dr. Ulrich Trautwein | Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  4. ^ ab"LEAD Graduate School and Research Network | LEAD Graduate School and Research Network |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  5. ^"DFG – GSC 1028: LEAD Graduate School & Research Network". dfg.de. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  6. ^"Hector-Stiftung unterstützt Bildungsforschung". tagblatt.de. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  7. ^"Productivity in educational psychology journals from 2003 to 2008". ScienceDirect. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  8. ^Greenbaum, Hannah; Meyer, Lisa; Smith, M Cecil; Barber, Amanda; Henderson, Heather; Riel, David; Robinson, Daniel H (2016). "Individual and Institutional Productivity in Educational Psychology Journals from 2009 to 2014". Educational Psychology Review. 28 (2): 215. doi:10.1007/s10648-016-9360-8. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  9. ^"TOSCA | Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  10. ^"TRAIN | Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  11. ^innov8 AG. "Coreched". coreched.ch. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  12. ^Bertram, Christiane; Wagner, Wolfgang; Trautwein, Ulrich (2017). "Learning Historical Thinking With Oral History Interviews: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Intervention Study of Oral History Interviews in History Lessons". American Educational Research Journal. 54 (3): 444. 
  13. ^"Fostering adolescents' value beliefs for mathematics with a relevance intervention in the classroom. – PubMed". NCBI. PMID 26192044. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  14. ^"Using individual interest and conscientiousness to predict academic effort: Additive, synergistic, or compensatory effects? – PubMed". NCBI. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  15. ^Chmielewski, Anna K; Dumont, Hanna; Trautwein, Ulrich (2016). "Tracking Effects Depend on Tracking Type". American Educational Research Journal. 50 (5): 925. doi:10.3102/0002831213489843. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  16. ^"psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-06744-001". psycnet.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  17. ^"psycnet.apa.org/record/2010-08635-015". psycnet.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  18. ^"psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-19591-007?doi=1". psycnet.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  19. ^"Different forces, same consequence: conscientiousness and competence beliefs are independent predictors of academic effort and achievement. – PubMed". NCBI. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  20. ^"Between-Teacher Differences in Homework Assignments and the Development of Students' Homework Effort, Homework Emotions, and Achievement (PDF Download Available)". researchgate.net. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  21. ^"psycnet.apa.org/record/2006-02911-009?doi=1". psycnet.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  22. ^"psycnet.apa.org/record/2006-21055-009". psycnet.apa.org. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  23. ^"Predicting homework effort: Support for a domain-specific, multilevel homework model (PDF Download Available)". researchgate.net. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 
  24. ^"Institute | Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology |". University Tübingen. Retrieved 2018-01-20. 

One thought on “Ulrich Trautwein Homework Online

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *